How to Go Vegan?

Some people think the plant-based, whole-foods diet is extreme. Half a million people a year will have their chests opened up and a vein taken from their leg and sewn onto their coronary artery. Some people would call that extreme.  ~Dr. Caldwell Esselstyn

How much protein do you need in a day?

56 grams per day for the average sedentary man.
46 grams per day for the average sedentary woman.

Can You Consume Sufficient Protein on a Vegan Diet?

Yes, when you eat greens, nuts, seeds, and legumes!
½ cup cooked beans = 8g protein
½ cup kale = 9g protein
¼ cup or 1 ounce of nuts (all types) 7g protein

How to be Vegan Daily?

  • 2 cups cooked Legumes (Beans and Peas) for protein
  • 1 cup Kale plus other Greens and Colourful Veggies for more protein, vitamins and minerals
  • 1 piece of Fruit to feed the brain,
  • 2-5 Tbsp. ground flax seed (chia seeds & walnuts) for Omega 3 Fatty Acids
  • 1/3 cup Seaweed to provide a balance of EPA and DHA.  For me, seaweed was the missing piece!

“Dulse has an unusually large amount of poly-unsaturated essential fatty acids, and a high concentration of EPA and DHA, which are omega-3 fatty acids. The ratio of omega-6 to omega-3 fatty acids in Dulse is close to 1, which is believed to be optimal.

Dulse has a high mineral content, with 112 different minerals and trace elements. Dulse is extremely high in iodine, a trace mineral that is converted to iodide by the human body, and stimulates the thyroid to supply hormones necessary for metabolism. Iodine helps inactivate bacteria, maintain a healthy immune system, prevent fibrocystic breast disease, and prevent miscarriages. It also encourages the development of strong nails, teeth, skin, and hair.

Dulse is also high in vitamin B6, which is essential for synthesizing protein, DNA, red blood cells, and cell membranes. It’s also important for processing protein, carbohydrates, and fats; for supporting your nervous system; for supporting hormonal balance and detoxification; for protecting your cardiovascular health; for preventing chronic inflammation, supporting cellular regeneration, and fighting disease.

One study found that dulse had potassium concentrations 34 times higher than a banana. Potassium helps regulate muscle contraction and nerve transmission; store carbohydrates for your muscles to use as fuel; maintain your body’s proper electrolyte and acid-base (pH) balance; lower blood pressure by counteracting the detrimental effects of sodium; and maintain the density and strength of your bones.

Just 1/3 cup of dulse provides 11 percent of the daily value for iron, which is vital for oxygen distribution, energy production, immune system function, DNA synthesis, and a stable mood. The same 1/3 cup of dulse provides 8.3 percent of the daily value for chromium, which helps control blood sugar and cholesterol levels, and influences the regulation of serotonin, the brain’s so-called happiness chemical.

Dulse has about 29% total fiber, nearly as much as oat bran. It’s also rich in riboflavin, which helps your body produce energy, assists with normal cell function and growth, helps folate and vitamin B6 undergo the chemical changes that make them available for your body, and acts as an antioxidant, potentially helping to prevent cancer and slow cholesterol buildup by controlling the proliferation of harmful free radicals.

Dulse is a good source of the minerals, magnesium, manganese, phosphorus, calcium, copper, and zinc.

A 1/3 cup serving of dulse has 18 calories, no saturated fat, no cholesterol, 2 grams of protein and 122 mg of sodium.

Dulse also has an unusually large amount of poly-unsaturated essential fatty acids, and a high concentration of EPA and DHA, which are omega-3 fatty acids. The ratio of omega-6 to omega-3 fatty acids in dulse is close to 1, which is believed to be optimal.

Dulse has a high polyphenol content with strong antioxidant properties that help prevent prevent heart disease and cancer.”

references: 
https://humanelivingnet.net/2013/09/03/adding-a-dose-of-dulse/
http://www.organicauthority.com/health/reasons-kale-is-the-new-beef-nutritious-sustainable.html
http://therosecottage.ca/